Alley's Place
To access this forum please register for FREE or login!

Alley's Place

Formerly Mums Hangout, Alleys Place is all the same info but with a few added extras!
 
HomeHome  GalleryGallery  FAQFAQ  SearchSearch  MemberlistMemberlist  UsergroupsUsergroups  RegisterRegister  Log inLog in  
Welcome to Alley's Place - A Place to Network - Laugh - Enquire - Learn - Love - Chat - Be Yourself and Just Hang Out.
Latest topics
» Raw Chocolate & Hazelnut Brownies
Wed Feb 22, 2017 12:27 pm by AlleyRose

» A New Way to Cook Chips!
Wed Feb 22, 2017 12:22 pm by AlleyRose

» Food binges and how to beat them
Wed Feb 22, 2017 12:20 pm by AlleyRose

» Popular “Diet” Ingredient Now Linked to Leukemia and Lymphoma in New Landmark Study on Humans
Wed Feb 22, 2017 12:13 pm by AlleyRose

» Are you being tricked into shopping badly?
Wed Feb 22, 2017 8:05 am by AlleyRose

» Broccoli, lentil and mushroom salad
Tue Feb 21, 2017 10:33 pm by AlleyRose

» David Cassidy: Ex-Partridge Family idol says he has dementia
Tue Feb 21, 2017 10:24 pm by AlleyRose

» Spotting the illness that can cause sudden blindness
Tue Feb 21, 2017 10:22 pm by AlleyRose

» Autism detectable in brain long before symptoms appear
Tue Feb 21, 2017 10:14 pm by AlleyRose

» Monstrous Spiders and Centipedes
Tue Feb 21, 2017 10:04 pm by AlleyRose

» Sir David Attenborough to present Blue Planet sequel
Tue Feb 21, 2017 9:59 pm by AlleyRose

» As Australia scorches, sea ice spread around Antarctica hits a record low
Tue Feb 21, 2017 9:52 pm by AlleyRose

» Welcome to the social media shopping mall
Tue Feb 21, 2017 9:49 pm by AlleyRose

» Effective social media — a key business objective
Tue Feb 21, 2017 9:47 pm by AlleyRose

» Pokemon Go NEWS: Hidden Niantic update solves BIGGEST Gen 2 problem
Tue Feb 21, 2017 9:33 pm by AlleyRose

» Rocket League on Xbox One: Microsoft reveal free Xbox Live Gold plans
Tue Feb 21, 2017 9:29 pm by AlleyRose

» Jupiter Ascending - One Of My Favs!
Mon Feb 20, 2017 11:28 pm by AlleyRose

» Fantastic Beasts and Where To Find Them
Mon Feb 20, 2017 11:25 pm by AlleyRose

» Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children
Mon Feb 20, 2017 11:23 pm by AlleyRose

» Why Your Grandparents Didn’t Have Food Allergies— But You Do
Mon Feb 20, 2017 11:08 pm by AlleyRose

Like/Tweet/+1








August 2017
MonTueWedThuFriSatSun
 123456
78910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
28293031   
CalendarCalendar






Whistle and Ivy


Moogly


Chocolate Chocolate and More


Confessions of a Homeschooler








Share | 
 

 Potatoes

View previous topic View next topic Go down 
AuthorMessage
AlleyRose
Admin
avatar

Posts : 1436
Join date : 2014-02-14
Age : 49

PostSubject: Potatoes   Mon Jun 09, 2014 10:50 am


Originally from South America, potatoes were adopted so enthusiastically in Europe that they became the staple food of many European peasant populations. And, up to fifty years ago, potatoes made up a substantial proportion of the Australian diet. Their dominance only began to fade after World War Two.
Potatoes were first brought to Australia in 1788 on the First Fleet. By the early 1800s they were being grown in abundance in the young colony.
In 1830 the first shipment of Tasmanian potatoes arrived in New South Wales. The island state quickly established itself as the premier supplier of superior spuds.
Potatoes used to be grown in just about every Australian backyard but their popularity in the garden has waned, just as it has in the kitchen. This is a shame because potatoes are easy to grow and fun to try. And, if you’re establishing a new garden, it’s worth reviving the old custom of planting potatoes to break up the soil.
Potatoes have been eaten by humans for at least eight millennia and, in the 21st century, they’re considered to be such an important food that the United Nations declared 2008 The Year of the Potato. The potato is a healthy and rich food source that produces more nutrition in a wider range of conditions than any other major crop. And, unlike cereals and grains, potatoes can be grown in the tiniest of backyards.
Growing Potatoes
So, here’s how you get started with spuds:

  • Seed potatoes are available at this time of year. These are the best to use as they are guaranteed to be virus free. In cold climates potatoes can be planted a few weeks before the last frost is expected. Another January planting is possible in most areas, but it can be harder to buy seed potatoes at that time.


  • Put the seed potatoes into a well lit (out of sunlight) spot for a few weeks to shoot. Make sure they’re kept reasonably dry and away from frost.


  • While you’re waiting for the sprouts (new shoots) to reach a few centimetres in length, spend time preparing the garden bed. Choose a sunny spot with well-drained soil (create a raised bed if soil is heavy) and dig in compost or old manure. Don’t add lime – potatoes prefer an acid soil.


  • Add in some Yates Professional Blood & Bone or Dynamic Lifter pellets.


  • If you’re short of space you can grow potatoes in a large pot or even an old bucket. Punch a few holes in the bottom of the bucket and half fill with compost-enriched Yates premium potting mix. Put a seed potato (more than one if the bucket is big) on top, then gradually fill with more mix as the stems grow.


  • Plant sprouted tubers with care so you don’t damage the young shoots.


  • Mulch thickly around potato plants to retain moisture and protect the tubers from light. Potatoes exposed to light turn green and develop a toxic substance.


  • Feed every two weeks with Thrive All Purpose and give the plants another dressing of Dynamic Lifter pellets in early summer.


  • Potatoes usually take three to four months to mature but you can ‘bandicoot’ small chats before then by hand digging beneath the plant and carefully extracting any of usable size. If you want to store mature potatoes, it’s best to wait until the plants have flowered and died down before harvesting.


Problems to watch out for

  • Snails and slugs can attack the young shoots. Use Blizem or Baysol pellets for protection.


  • Aphids are worth controlling because they can spread disease. Apply Yates Tomato & Vegetable Dust or Nature’s Way Natrasoap.


  • Fungal diseases can affect potatoes. The worst is the blight that caused the total failure of the potato crop in 19th century Ireland and the subsequent starvation or exodus of more than a million people. It begins with leaf spots and spreads to the stems and tubers. The disease is favoured by humid weather with cool nights and warm days. Regular dusting with Yates Tomato & Vegetable Dust will help protect from this and many other diseases, as well as a range of pests.


Hint
Don’t have room for a potato bed? Try growing your spuds in a large pot or a four-high stack of old tyres.
http://www.yates.com.au/vegetables/grow/potatoes/
Back to top Go down
View user profile http://alleysplace.forumotion.com
 
Potatoes
View previous topic View next topic Back to top 
Page 1 of 1

Permissions in this forum:You cannot reply to topics in this forum
Alley's Place :: The Garden Gnome :: Growing Veges-
Jump to: